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Lea Industries Recalls 63,000 Beds for Kids Due to Risks of Falling

[Photo Source: Lea Industries]

[Photo Source: Lea Industries]

Around 63,000 beds produced and distributed by Lea Industries have been recalled in the U.S. and Canada. The decision is due to the furniture’s weak support rails that are likely to break which could in turn lead to injuries.

The Figures

According to a report by BloombergBusinessweek, there were already two injuries recorded by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission dating back to 2009 involving their beds for kids. Then, around 22 reports have been filed in the U.S. about accidental falling from the recalled children’s beds while one has been reported in Canada.

The Recalled Products

The report strongly advised customers against using the Lea panel, loft and bunk beds because of the big tendency of its side mattress support rail to give away. The beds included in the recall come in twin, full and queen sizes. However, it cleared out that the platform beds that were manufactured in 2010 are not included in the recall.

Some of the affected furniture is sold in Direct Buy and other local stores. Online stores such as Amazon, eBay and other websites have been offering them since 2008 for around $400 to as much as $3,000.

How to Get Replacement

If you happened to own one of the beds mentioned in the report, you should immediately call the manufacturer for a free replacement of the side rails. They can be reached through their toll free hotline at (888) 770-7116 during Monday through Friday at 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET. You could also contact them through their website by clicking this link to arrange the replacement of your furniture.

About Lea Industries

Lea Industries is incorporated with the La-Z-Boy company and it is based in High Point, North Carolina. It is known to manufacture furniture that caters to young customers. Based on their website, the company has been in the business for more than 140 years. They have started their business back in 1896.

Source: BloombergBusinessweek and Lea Industries

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